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Home Inspection – A Sellers Advantage

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The Boston Phoenix reported in an article,”Condo owners Warned To Get A Home Inspection” that condo boards are giving owners legal advice and say that Home inspectors are advising sellers to get the property inspected before putting it up for sale. This is not true, do Home inspectors care if a condo sells? Of course not. But this article was intended to lend support to the statement that C condo boards are encouraging condo owners to get a home inspection done before selling, while sellers associations are simultaneously advising sellers to get a home inspection done after selling a current building. The latest foray into the condo sale arena is often seen as costing condo owners money.

Home owners should understand that if an H.I.C.D. Condominium Corporation ( nexus too) has an inspection done, and the buyer could discriminate on the basis of finding deficiencies in the condominium, then both the agent and the board, and all the owners, could be sued and there could be court costs. หนังใหม่ชนโรง I’ve seen situations where a buyer has gone ahead and hired an independent inspector, without disclosing to the seller that the Condominium Corporation had a home inspection done, and suddenly discovered defects in the home. Because disclosure is such an important issue with condominium sales, condo boards of directors should understand that if they get an inspection done, and the buyer relies on the report to justify the price being quoted by the seller and the board, and the buyer suddenly finds a defect, แนะนำหนังใหม่ then one of the board members could be forced to resign for disobeying the condo declaration.

However, regardless of whether condos need home inspections or not, the cost of having one done is really as nominal as two in-house inspections but having a condo board do a home inspection while all the members are busy entertaining offers of purchase, buying and selling pre-construction contracts… and then when all the pre-construction contracts have sold and the buyers are ready to move forward, when they are ready to move… well, ช่วยตัวเอง when the condo board does its condo inspection, they should include all this in their report to the buyer.

“There are no proven rules about the necessity of home inspections, but absent legal counsel, I will recommend that a home inspection be done just to make sure… all units are checked.”

“Sellers should realize that a home inspection is something they should do early, not at closing… they are free to purchase and move forward, not just when someone is ready to close… they will be buying not just a house, but land and air rights and amenities as well… Units aren’t in a building. They are in a home.”

Well then, what is “selling”? Couldn’t they purchase a condo, use the unit to live in, move into the condos and then157 SF.

Also, what are condo board member’s other jobs? While it may be illegal for one condo board member to profit from selling an unoccupied unit, what about all those other owners who are putting their unit on the market? คลิปโป๊เอเชีย Ask them. Should any of them be allowed to profit from the sale of any unit? Would they be violating their condo declaration which is at their expense, even though they don’t have a problem with selling their unoccupied unit… An unoccupied unit mentioned I am sure is generating income that generates board revenue to pay for the expenses of the entire property. That wealthy couple would not dream of purchasing a condo that was being sold to someone who had a home inspection likely, in their opinion.

The bottom line is to note that there are no proven rules about the necessity of home inspections, but it would be foolish to pretend that there are. If your buyer is dubious about the home inspection, or you find a defect in the home inspection report, ฉากเด็ดหนังโป๊ just contact the board for an informal discussion. If all is well, go forward with the sale. However, we should all be aware there is an escape clause where you can terminate the sale without obligation to your buyer, provided they comply with the condo declaration. If not, you can offer the condo buyer either an extension of time for the unit to be inspected and repaired, or an automatic rent-a-box fee to move out. An escape clause is one thing, but there should be an agreement to linger on if the buyer fails to move in because of the condition of the unit.

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